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Insight: Hiring Developers

There’s a very interesting blog post over at Raw Thought on the topic of hiring developers. It offers the following insight on hiring: There are three questions you have when you’re hiring a programmer (or anyone, for that matter): Are they smart? Can they get stuff done? Can you work with them?

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Data Mining — Handling Missing Values the Database

I’ve recently answered Predicting missing data values in a database on StackOverflow and thought it deserved a mention on DeveloperZen. One of the important stages of data mining is preprocessing, where we prepare the data for mining. Real-world data tends to be incomplete, noisy, and inconsistent and an important task when preprocessing the data is to fill in missing values, smooth out noise and correct inconsistencies.

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Introduction to MapReduce for .NET Developers

The basic model for MapReduce derives from the map and reduce concept in functional languages like Lisp. In Lisp, a map takes as input a function and a sequence of values and applies the function to each value in the sequence. A reduce takes as input a sequence of elements and combines all the elements using a binary operation (for example, it can use “+” to sum all the elements in the sequence).

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99 Ways to Become a Better Developer

I’ve encountered this post on my weekend reading — 91 Surefire Ways to Become an Event Greater Developer. It contain a comprehensive guide linking to all sort of blog posts providing insights on improving your skills as a developer. While the list is very long and sometimes debatable it does have some interesting pointers.

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How Do You Define "Good Code"?

I was on a phone interview the other day where I was asked for my definition of “Good Code”. The first thought that came to mind was maintainability – if it can’t be understood, maintained and extended by other developers than its definitely not good. Then, other things came to mind: efficiency, elegance (simple, proper use of language constructs and environment capabilities), modularity, proper object-oriented design, …